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Omega Watches at European Watch Co.

Below is our current in stock inventory of Omega watches. If you have a Omega watch you are interested in selling or trading please contact us.

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Camera Icon SVG 43710

Speedmaster Professional Black Dial SS

Ref. No 311.33.42.30.01.001

Camera Icon SVG 44499

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M Master Co-Axial 41MM SS

Ref. No 220.13.41.21.06.001

In Stock

Omega Seamaster Diver 300M Co-Axial Master Chronometer 42MM 2018

(44523) Omega 210.32.42.20.04.001 Seamaster Diver 300M Co-Axial Master Chronometer, 21032422004001, 210 32 42 20 04 001, stainless steel case on strap with a stainless steel buckle, automatic Omega Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8800 movement, 55-hour power reserve, white wave dial with date at 6 o'clock, luminescent hands and hour markers, black ceramic rotating bezel, diameter: 42mm, thickness: 14mm, sapphire crystal, water ...

In Stock

Omega Specialties Museum Collection CK 859 SECTOR DIAL

(44462) Omega 511.12.39.21.99.002 Specialties CK 859 51112392199002, numbered edition, stainless steel on a leather strap with a stainless steel tang buckle, Co-Axial Master Chronometer manual wind caliber 8926 with 72 hour power reserve, 925 silver sector dial with blue Arabic numerals and chapter rings, blued sword-shaped hands, markings, small seconds at 6 o'clock, sapphire crystal, water resistant to 30M, diameter: 39mm, thick...

In Stock

Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional Sedna Gold

(44212) Omega 310.63.42.50.01.001 Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional Sedna Gold, 31063425001001, 18K "Sedna" rose gold alloy on a Omega black leather strap with Omega Sedna gold deployant buckle, manual wind Omega caliber 3861 movement, 12-hour chronograph, black dial, black tachymeter scale, display caseback, water resistant to 100ft, diameter: 42mm, thickness: 14mm. Like New with Original Omega box and papers dated June of 2021.

In Stock

Omega Vintage Speedmaster Pre-Moon SS

(44265) Omega 145.012-67 SP Speedmaster Professional, 145 012 67 SP, 145012 67, the first Speedmaster reference to set foot on the moon, stainless steel HF case on a strap, manual wind Omega Caliber 321 movement, chronograph, original dial with applied metal logo and nice creamy patina, matching hands that have aged similarly to the dial, "Dot Over 90" tachymeter bezel, acrylic Hesalite crystal, 25 mil serial (1967), diameter: 42mm...

In Stock

Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional Sedna Gold

(44501) Omega 310.60.42.50.01.001 Speedmaster Moon watch Professional Sedna Gold, 31060425001001, 18K "Sedna" rose gold alloy on a matching rose gold bracelet, manual wind Omega caliber 3861 movement, 12-hour chronograph, black dial, black tachymeter scale, display caseback, water resistant to 100ft, diameter: 42mm, thickness: 14mm. Like New with Original Omega box and papers dated 2021.

In Stock

Omega Speedmaster Professional Apollo XIII Silver Snoopy Award FULL SET

(44410) Omega 311.32.42.30.04.003, 31132423004003, Apollo XIII Silver Snoopy Award Speedmaster Professional, limited edition to 1970 pieces, stainless steel on a black, coated nylon and leather strap, manual wind movement (Omega 1861), chronograph, white dial, symbol of the Snoopy Award "Failure Is Not An Option!" at 9 o'clock. Like New and barely worn with its original box, Apollo 13 Newspaper, Silver Snoopy pin, commemorative mat...

In Stock

Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean 600M Co-Axial Master Chronometer SS

(44288) Omega 215.32.44.21.01.001 Seamaster Planet Ocean 600M Co-Axial Master Chronometer 21532442101001, stainless steel on an Omega composite strap with a stainless steel deployant buckle, automatic in-house Omega Caliber 8900 movement, 60-hour power reserve, chronometer date at 3 o'clock, glossy black dial with applied luminous hour markers and orange Arabic numerals, orange and black "Liquid Metal Bezel", sweep second hand, lum...

On Hold

Omega Speedmaster Yellow Gold / Strap Black Dial RARE

(44295) Omega Speedmaster 145.00.52, 1450052, 18k yellow gold case has started to develop a nice patina, on a strap with a matching 18k yellow gold deployant buckle, manual wind Omega caliber 863 movement, black dial with applied gold hour markers and luminous hands, black ceramic bezel with a gold tachymeter scale, chronograph, diameter: 42mm, thickness: 14.5mm, water resistant to 50 meters. Excellent Condition with Omega box.

In Stock

Omega Speedmaster Professional Brown Dial "Sapphire Sandwich"

(43911) Omega Speedmaster Professional 311.30.42.30.13.001 Sapphire Sandwich Brown Dial, 31130423001006, 'First Watch Worn on the Moon', stainless steel on a stainless steel bracelet, manual wind Omega caliber 1863 movement, chronograph, brown dial with luminous hour markers, water resistant to 100ft, sapphire crystal, display back, diameter: 42mm, thickness: 14mm. Like New with Omega Box, additional brown strap with deploy and com...

In Stock

Omega Speedmaster CK 2998 Silver / Blue Dial LIMITED

(44279) Omega 311.33.40.30.02.001 Speedmaster CK2998, 31133403002001, Limited Edition of 2998 pieces, stainless steel case on a blue alligator strap with a stainless steel tang buckle, manual wind Omega caliber 1861 movement, 12-hour chronograph, silver dial with blue subdials and minute track, water resistant to 167ft, diameter: 39.7mm, thickness: 14mm. Like New with Omega box and papers dated 2017.

Guide to Omega Watches

Omega produces roughly half a million watches every year. As one of the most popular watch brands in the world, Omega accounts for 8.8% of total annual sales within the overall market.

The co-axial escapement was developed by George Daniels in 1974 in an effort to reduce friction between the pallet fork and the escapement wheel, and to eliminate wasted motion within the escapement assembly. Daniels was able to fix these issues by stacking two balance wheels using a common axis. One of the wheels is used for locking and the other for unlocking. By separating the functions, the co-axial escapement reduces friction and unnecessary motion within the system and as a result, watches equipped with the technology have the ability to function more accurately and also require less frequent servicing. Omega adopted the Co-axial technology in 1999 with the introduction of their caliber 2500.

NASA began the search for a dependable chronograph appropriate for space travel shortly after President Eisenhower launched the Apollo Program. Rolex, Hamilton, Longines-Wittnauer, Bulova, Elgin, Omega, Benrus, Mido, Gruen, and Lucien Picard were among the companies who made prototypes for NASA's watch testing. NASA put these prototypes through a battery of tests, including extreme temperature fluctuations from minus 260 degrees to over 260 degrees Fahrenheit, gravity simulations, humidity tests, and an acceleration test to guarantee shock tolerance. After all of the rigorous testing, the only watch that remained functional was the Omega Speedmaster. NASA certified the Omega Speedmaster for both space flight and extravehicular travel in March 1965 and it remains NASA's official timepiece to this day.

On July 20th, 1969, astronaut Buzz Aldrin stepped out of the Apollo 11 lunar module and touched down on the moon's surface. Strapped to his wrist, was an Omega Speedmaster Professional, reference ST105.021, with a Lemania-based caliber 321 inside. This reference is a more durable version of the Omega prototype that was used in the NASA testing. A blockier 42mm case with crown guards and bigger chronograph pushers was part of the redesign. The bigger pushers give greater grip for the astronaut while outfitted in full equipment, and the blockier housing adds extra shock and acceleration protection. These modest adjustments secured the modern-day Speedmaster's appearance, which we have grown to know and appreciate. Unfortunately, in the 1970s, Buzz Aldrin's Speedy was stolen while in transit from NASA headquarters to the Smithsonian Museum where it was set to be displayed for the world to admire.

In 1983, the Swiss watch group SSIH, which at the time included Omega, Tissot, and Lemania, merged with the watch conglomerate ASUAG, to create what is now known as the SWATCH Group. Over the years, the SWATCH Group has built up a diverse portfolio of 18 watch brands ranging in both quality and price. Omega occupies a unique space in the “upper-mid-tier” of the portfolio’s hierarchy, and sits alongside brands such as Blancpain, Harry Winston, Glashutte Original and Jaquet Droz. Omega is widely regarded as the second most popular watch brand in the World.

History of Omega Watches

Omega Logo
Louis Brandt
Louis Brandt

The Omega Legend began humbly like so many other pioneering horologic entrepreneurs of the 19th century, but it's founder's legacy would literally go to the moon. A 23-year-old watchmaker named Louis Brandt opened his small pocket watch workshop in La Chaux de Fonds, Switzerland in 1848. He was a comptoir d'etabilissage, a superb technician, and a sub-contracting watch manufacturer. A passionate perfectionist and artist, his watches were beautifully accurate and his reputation in Switzerland as well as all over Europe was notable. He came along at the cusp of the industrial change in watch making, as Switzerland prepared to embrace the idea of mass production and interchangeable components for the pocket watch, essentially an American vision brought to Europe by Civil War veteran Florentine Ariosto Jones of Boston.

Although Brandt died at 54 in 1879, he'd thoroughly prepared his sons César and Louis-Paul Brandt to love his business.

After their father passed away they rented a floor in a building in Bienne and set up a modern watch production manufactory using their father's legacy and the money he left to them. They were educated in history and the classics and their company Louis Brandt & Frere produced watches with Golden Age names like "Celtic", "Gurzelen", "Helvetia", "Jura", and "Patria".

César and Louis-Paul Brandt
César and Louis-Paul Brandt
An 1897/8 Louis Brandt & Freres Labrador movement
An 1897/8 Louis Brandt & Freres Labrador movement

In 1885 they introduced their first series (mass) produced caliber named the "Labrador", a lever movement that had a precision within 30-seconds a day. By 1889 they were enjoying an unprecedented success, becoming the largest watch manufacture in Switzerland, producing over 100,000 examples a year. Their advertising poster showed photographs of all fifteen of the modern high-ceiling, and well-illuminated work rooms of their manufactory, essentially setting a world standard for Switzerland and everywhere else. They were the epitome of the promise of modernization.

Louis Brandt & Frere Manufacture
Louis Brandt & Frere Manufacture

In 1892, discretely in partnership with prestigious watchmaker Audemars Piguet, the brothers introduced the First Minute-Repeater timepiece, a miniaturized version of a complicated pocket watch for the wrist that chimed the minutes and hours.

Two years later, in what would be a watershed moment for their company, they brought out a 19-line watch caliber they called "Omega" after the final letter of the Greek alphabet, traditionally as well as symbolically suggesting it was the end-all and be-all, which many thought it was. It became a game-changer throughout Europe; the Omega caliber had easily interchangeable components, was relatively simply constructed, and it enjoyed an overwhelming success, proving that high production and such a diminutive size didn't mean a lessening of precision and accuracy.

1892 Brandt & Freres Minute repeater
1892 Brandt & Freres Minute repeater
The Pre-WWI Global Omega Logo
The Pre-WWI Global Omega Logo

In 1900 the first wristwatches with the Omega name were produced and used by British officers in the South African Boer War, gaining a reputation as a rugged military watch.

British officers in the South African Boer War
British officers in the South African Boer War

These watches, powered by the Caliber HN B movement, were later exhibited at the Universal Exposition in Paris, where they won the Grand Prix. The depth of their abilities at scientific achievement were beginning to seem bottomless; however, like true partners, in 1903 both César and Louis-Paul Brandt passed away.

They, like their father, had also instilled in their children a love for the industry, and so they had no problem leaving one of Switzerland's largest watch manufacturers (with 800 employees who created 240,000 watches a year) to their children, Louis' sons Adrien and Paul-Emile, and Cesar's sons Ernest and Gustave. The four inheritors received the company with the Omega caliber at a height of success, and in 1904 that innovative caliber eventually led to their official renaming of the brand to the "Omega Watch Company", which was allegedly suggested by their banker Henri Rieckel.

Brandt Family
Brandt Family

Already renowned for a scientific degree of accuracy in their timepieces, in 1905 the company became the official timekeeper for Swiss sporting events.

Their Omega brand was synonymous with precision, and in 1909 they made an international sports debut by officially timing the Gordon Bennett Cup – a precision balloon race. By 1909 they had indeed become a global phenomenon as they began selling watches on 6 continents. Their series-produced watch movements were accurate, well made, and easy to maintain and repair with that new 20th century modularity that revolutionized the watch industry.

Official Timekeeper Swiss Sporting-Events
Official Timekeeper Swiss Sporting-Events
Gordon Bennett Cup
Gordon Bennett Cup

The first war in which soldiers wore wristwatches gave Omega a new place in history. In 1917 the British Royal Flying Corps made Omega watches their official timekeepers for its combat units during World War I, followed by the American army in 1918.

Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Moderne
Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Moderne

Following the company's triumphant service in the Great War, Omega's chronometers won the top awards at the prestigious observatory timing competition in Neuchâtel in 1919.

Omega Art Deco watch
Omega Art Deco watch

As the multi-faceted Art Deco movement was sweeping post-war Europe in 1925 Omega exhibited their breathtaking Art Deco watches at the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Moderne, once more winning the Grand Prize and turning European fashion on its ear. This was followed by further first places in 1931 when they set precision records in all six categories at the Geneva Observatory trials. That same year they released a prototype of the first two-weight automatic movement, providing bilateral winding, quickly becoming the industry standard.

In 1932 Omega became the first watchmaker to officially time the entire Olympic games in Los Angeles making them the premier event timekeepers to this day. They were able to time 1/10th seconds for those Olympics, but the company has progressed with the years and in 2021 they now measure to 1/1000th seconds.

1932 Olympic Stopwatch
1932 Olympic Stopwatch
Official Timekeeper 1932 Olympics
Official Timekeeper 1932 Olympics

That same year of 1932 they introduced the first commercially sold diving watch that was double case sealed in cork, named the "Marine." It was water resistant to an astounding 135 meters, as well as one of the most fashionable dive watches ever made with its Art Deco tonneau design. It was dive-tested by Commander Yves Le Prieur, the French naval officer who invented the aqualung. It was tested to 73 meters in Lake Geneva, but five years later it was found to actually be completely waterproof to 135 meters.

1932 Omega Marine CK 679
1932 Omega Marine CK 679

In 1936 Omega introduced a brand-new technology to the Olympic Winter Games in Garmisch-Partenkirchen using two separate chronographs to time the downhill skiing races – one at the start and another at the finish of the competition.

The great American runner and winner of 4 gold medals, Jessie Owens, was timed by an Omega 185 chronograph. They also set the world precision record of 97.8 points at the observatory exhibition at Kew-Teddington in England, and in 1940 they introduced photoelectric cell technology to the Olympics.

1936 Olympic Skiing
1936 Olympic Skiing
1936 World Precision Record
1936 World Precision Record
1945 Dirty Dozen watch
1945 Dirty Dozen watch

When World War II began Omega utilized its history of military watchmaking to once again support the effort, shipping thousands of watches to the Allied forces, and eventually sending 150,000 of their "Dirty Dozen" military wristwatches to Great Britain, which were issued to elite units, artillery, and radio operators in 1945.

The company introduced their iconic Omega Seamaster dive watch after World War II in 1948, designed by Rene Bannwart in honor of Omega's 100th anniversary, on the suggestion of Omega's sales director Adolphe Vallat.

The concept was to produce a watch for the working American male with the durability and precision of their military watches, with virtues such as shock protection and anti-magnetic resistance. At 34mm in diameter, the Seamaster was beautifully made and accurate, with outstanding water resistance.

1948 Seamaster
1948 Seamaster
1952 Constellation
1952 Constellation

The designers and engineers at Omega introduced the Constellation line in 1952, the first of their officially certified wrist chronometers as well as their contribution to higher fashion. It was named for the eight stars on its emblem that represented the eight precision records set at the Geneva Observatory and at Kew-Teddington; however, sleek and stylish designs accompanied that supreme accuracy. At the Helsinki Olympic games in 1952 they introduced the first electronic timing technology for which they won the Olympic Cross of Merit for Omega's pioneering contributions to sports.

Up until now Omega had made all of its innovations and advancements with men's styled timepieces.

In 1955 they released their Ladymatic, the first automatic chronometers for women, watches of compact dimension and beautiful styling with rotor-driven automatic movements. In December of 1956 Omega strapped a Seamaster to the fuselage of Canadian Pacific Airways flight 302 for a journey over the Polar route from Canada to Amsterdam for 9-hours of sub-zero punishment: it landed in perfect working order.

Ladymatic
Ladymatic
1956 Polar Flight Test
1956 Polar Flight Test

In 1957 Omega released the watch that would become a legend like no other. Jacques Reymond, who worked for Omega's subsidiary Lemania, had been working on a new chronograph design since 1942, built around the caliber 27.

Called "321," this new watch was further developed by Albert Piguet, with the now iconic case designed by Claude Baillod, on a team with prototype maker Georges Hartmann and machinist Desire Faivre. This became the Speedmaster in 1957, after fifteen-years of experimentation and research. 1957 was a year of three Omega professional legends, including the pioneering "Speedmaster," (which eventually became the "Moonwatch,") the "Seamaster 300" dive watch, and the "Railmaster," the first wristwatch to resist magnetic fields of more than 1,000 gauss.

Caliber 321
Caliber 321
Speedmaster
Speedmaster
Seamaster
Seamaster
Railmaster
Railmaster
JFK Slimline
JFK Slimline

In 1961 President elect John F. Kennedy wore an Omega slimline watch to his inauguration on January 20th , and on October 3, 1962, Astronaut Walter Schirra took his Omega Speedmaster Chronograph into space for 9-hours on board the Mercury Sigma 7 rocket. In 1965, NASA, after rigorous testing of all chronometer/chronographs, chose to use the "Speedmaster Professional" chronograph wristwatch as it's official timekeeper.

It was the first watch designated for Extravehicular Activity and it's still the only certified watch with the NASA stamp of approval. In 1967 the one millionth Omega chronometer was certified. That same year saw the introduction of the De Ville line of dress watches with the ultra-slim caliber 620, with Omega De Ville watches winning 6 Golden Rose awards at the Baden-Baden design awards over the next several years. 1967 also saw the Omega introduction of "touchpad" sensors for swimming competitions, utilized in every Olympics since 1968. It was also the first Olympics to use Omega electronic timekeeping for every event.

NASA Official Timekeeper
NASA Official Timekeeper
1967 De Ville
1967 De Ville
Railmaster
1976 Electronic Olympic Timer

In 1969, on July 21st, when astronaut Neil Armstrong said, "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," becoming the first human being to step onto the moon, he wore his Omega Speedmaster Professional Chronograph, taking the brand 238,900 miles farther than any timepiece ever produced.

This was also the year that Omega installed 9 precision timekeeping instruments on the cockpit of the new Concorde SST. Until the plane was retired in 2003, Concorde pilots wore Omega watches, including Captain John Hackett, the first pilot to take the plane across the Atlantic Ocean.

Neil Armstrong Apollo 11
Neil Armstrong Apollo 11
Silver Snoopy Award watch
Silver Snoopy Award watch

When NASA dodged disaster with the Apollo 13 moon launch in April of 1970, it was because the astronauts had to manually fire an engine in order to re-align the craft for re-entry into the earth's atmosphere, using their Speedmasters to time the critical 14-second fuel burn. This happy ending led NASA to reward Omega with the "Silver Snoopy Award," because like Charlie Brown's dog, the astronauts were able to keep their sense of humor in such a dire experience.

Apollo 17 mission Commander astronaut Gene Cernan wore his Omega Speedmaster for three days on the last moon visit, while module captain Ron Evans used his own Speedmaster to conduct heat and flow convection experiments. Capturing the world's imagination, the two-millionth Omega chronometer was certified in 1972.

1972 Chronometer
1972 Chronometer

Omega's "Megaquartz" marine-chronometer was released in 1974 with a stunning daily timing variation of just two-thousands of a second, in a precision testing trial that lasted 63 days.

Omega received its 100,000th official rating certificate for quartz chronometers on May 18,1983. That same year a museum for the company was opened on the 16th of December. In 1995 Omega released the first wristwatch with a centrally mounted tourbillon.

1974 Marine Chronometer
1974 Marine Chronometer
1995 Tourbillon
1995 Tourbillon

In 1999 the company took a huge technological leap in introducing their "Coaxial" caliber 2500 movement.

1999 Coaxial watch
1999 Coaxial watch

It replaced the traditional Swiss lever escapement with a coaxial wheel, and escape wheel, and a lever with three pallet stones. Developed by British horologist George Daniels, the new escapement and a novel free-sprung balance combined to greatly improve accuracy and expand service intervals to an entire decade. The structure of the movement was revised to reduce the friction prolong the viscosity of the lubricant on the balance.

A freshly renewed interest in the Speedmaster 300 was ignited by the James Bond film franchise as actor Pierce Brosnan wore his Omega for the third time in 2002 in "Die Another Die," followed by a new Bond played by Daniel Craig in "Casino Royale," which also debuted the Seamaster Diver 300M with it's new coaxial escapement.

In 2008 Omega released its new Si14 Silicon balance spring to reduce deviation and instability, and the new Bond film "Quantum of Solace" premiered with Daniel Craig sporting a Seamaster Planet Ocean 600M co-Axial chronometer. Omega once again focused on the ladies by reinvigorating the Ladymatic line in 2010, this time with the new Co-Axial movement.

Goldeneye Seamaster
Goldeneye Seamaster
Royale Seamaster
Royale Seamaster
Balance Spring
Balance Spring
Ladymatic 2010
Ladymatic 2010

In 2011 Omega joined Daniel Craig in a partnership to support ORBIS International, an organization treating preventable blindness all over the world, especially for the most vulnerable people on the planet.

Craig accompanied the ORBIS flying hospital to Mongolia to document the incredible effort. Omega introduced a special edition of the De Ville Hour Vision Blue watch to further support ORBIS. That same year The PGA made Omega the official timekeeper for every golf tournament, making the company the technological stable of sporting events.

Orbis Flying Eye Hospital
Orbis Flying Eye
PGA Official Timekeeper
PGA Official Timekeeper

Omega produced "Planet Ocean" in 2012, an ecological documentary film that was an elegant attempt to raise world consciousness about the plight of our oceans and the endangered marine world. It was premiered at the Rio+20 Earth Summit in Brazil and eventually it was shown at the United Nations.

Omega's additional cinematic triumph came that October with the premiere of the new Bond film in London of "Skyfall," in which Daniel Craig dazzles the world with two Omega Seamasters with caliber 8500 movements, including a 42mm Planet Ocean 600M with a black dial and bezel, and a slightly more stylish blue-dial Aqua Terra. In 2013 Omega presented their contribution to combating magnetic fields of more than 15,000 gauss with their Co-Axial caliber 8508, a movement that resists magnetism using non-ferromagnetic materials instead of the traditional protective soft iron inner case.

Co Axial Caliber 8508
Co Axial Caliber 8508
Planet Ocean
Planet Ocean

Omega, no longer confident that the certifications for watch movements met the standards of their new watches, founded a new watch certification protocol in 2015 that was approved by the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology (METAS).

This either matched or was more stringent than the Controle Official Suisse des Chronometres (COSC) standards. Also, that year the Bond film "SPECTRE" premiered featuring a Seamaster 300 version of the 1957 watch except with a new caliber 8400 movement.

METAS Watch Certification
METAS Watch Certification Protocol
Spectre Watch
Spectre Watch
New factory and museum
New factory and museum

In 2017 Omega moved out of their original manufactory in Bienne and into a masterpiece designed by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban. It's a true work of art, ecologically planned, bright with natural light, and with the use of natural construction materials. It was created with a modularity that will allow growth from within for new technologies and machinery. In 2019 the new Omega museum opened, a glass, steel, and Swiss timber beam ovoid sculptural building, also designed by Shigeru Ban. Besides all of the vintage Omega watches, the museum offers fascinating displays, interactive experiences, and instructive movies. It includes a huge walk-in Omega Speedmaster with a Co-Axial escapement, an Omega history of women's watchmaking, a lunar landscape, and of course a "James Bond world" exhibition.

The famous Omega caliber 321, the first movement utilized in the Speedmaster that went to the moon, was brought back into production in 2019, carefully engineered by a group of historians, watchmakers, craftsmen, researchers, and developers.

That year was also notable as The Five Deeps Expedition Team with captain Victor Vescovo took their Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional Chronometer to the bottom of the Mariana Trench in a world record dive of 10,925 meters. In 2019 Omega also released a new sports watch, the Seamaster Aqua Terra "Ultra Light." Produced from an alloy used in the aeronautical industry called Gamma Titanium, it weighs a stunningly light 55 grams.

Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional Chronometer
Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional Chronometer
2019 Aqua Terra Ultra Light
2019 Aqua Terra Ultra Light

The models offered by Omega

CONSTELLATION

The stylish Constellation has a legendary styling que that carries the lines of the strap or bracelet throughout the watch. This was a tradition invented by Omega designer Pierre Moinat in 1964 with the Constellation BA.368.0847 model. The Constellation is a grand and broad line with lots of variations; there are currently 268 selections from 25mm to 41mm with mechanical movements, and there are an additional 9 mechanical Co-axial Master Chronometers with Omega calibers 8700/8701. There are also 436 different quartz battery Constellation watches. Omega has integrated precious metals as well as diamonds into many of the Constellation designs.

Constellation-131.10.39.20.01.001
Constellation

GLOBEMASTER

Omega calls the Globemaster the "world's first Master Chronometer" as well as their most advanced mechanical movement. A true son of the Constellation models (the dials all have the rhodium-plated Constellation "star"), this Co-Axial Master Chronometer is noted for its fluted bezel, it's "pan" dial (a reference from the first 1952 Constellation), its 39mm diameter, and its caliber powerful Co-Axial 8900/8901 engines. It's water resistant to 100 meters/330 feet and it's available in 11 models in various stainless-steel and precious metals, all thoughtfully anti-magnetic to 15,000 gauss with anti-reflective coated sapphire crystals.

Constellation Globemaster 130.30.39.21.03.001
Constellation Globemaster

SEAMASTER

As one of the premier marine and dive watches in the world, this collection has grown to be enormous with it's iconic hippocampus seahorse emblem. Ranging in style and size from a petite 30mm to a formidable 43mm, there are 20 base models with a stunning 282 variations of the Seamaster Aqua Terra 150-meter watches. The more advanced Diver 300-meter Co-Axial Master Chronometers include 7 base configurations from 41mm to 44mm with 52 different models, and for the more professional divers Omega offers the 8 Planet Ocean 600 meter (2000 feet) Co-Axial Master Chronometers with 81 variations from 37.5mm to 45.5mm. The Heritage collection is also quite extensive, with 7 types of Co-Axial Master Chronometers including the Seamaster 300 (37 models), 2 Railmasters (with 8 models), the Olympic Official Timekeeper (14 models), the iconic Ploprof 1200-meter (with 5 models for those 4,000 foot dives), the 10 different City Editions, the Bullhead (3 variations), and the Seamaster 1948 (4 models). To commemorate the 25 years of James Bond and Omega, which started with GoldenEye in 1995, the coming 2021 James Bond film "No Time to Die" will be accompanied by their new Seamaster Diver 300m 007 Edition. It's lightweight grade 2 titanium, with a mesh Milanese bracelet, and it's powered by the Omega Co-Axial Chronometer 8806 movement.

Seamaster Aqua Terra
Seamaster Aqua Terra
Seamaster Diver
Seamaster Diver
Seamaster
Seamaster
Railmaster
Railmaster
Seamaster Olympic Official Timekeeper
Seamaster Olympic Official Timekeeper
Seamaster Ploprof
Seamaster Ploprof
Seamaster City Edition
Seamaster City Edition
Seamaster Bullhead
Seamaster Bullhead
Seamaster 1948
Seamaster 1948
Seamaster Diver
Seamaster Diver

SPEEDMASTER

The Speedmaster, in development since 1942 and released officially in 1957, includes 12 models of the MOONWATCH PROFESSIONAL (each 42mm). There are 32 HERITAGE Speedmaster chronometers and chronographs ranging from 39.7mm to 46.2mm. There are 15 variations of the DARK SIDE OF THE MOON (all 44.25mm). The Co-Axial SPEEDMASTER 38MM chronometers come in 20 different models. The new TWO-COUNTER Speedmasters Co-Axial Chronoscope chronometers come in 7 variations (43mm), inspired by Omega chronograph wristwatches from the 1940's, with spiral "snail" dial track patterns, tachymeters, and pulsometers, but with the new Omega 9908 movement. Also notable in this collection are the new SPEEDMASTER RACING (10 models), the SPEEDMASTER MOONPHASE (13 models), and the SPEEDMASTER CHRONOGRAPH (3 variations). The Speedmaster INSTRUMENTS line has two types of radically different and very futuristic watches – The SPEEDMASTER SKYWALKER X-33 (2 quartz-powered models), and the SPEEDMASTER Z-33, a Solar impulse timepiece powered by a quartz chronograph movement.

Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional
Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional
Heritage Speedmaster Moonwatch
Heritage Speedmaster Moonwatch
Speedmaster Dark Side Of The Moon
Speedmaster Dark Side Of The Moon
Speedmaster 38mm
Speedmaster 38mm
Speedmaster-Chronoscope
Speedmaster Chronoscope
Speedmaster-Racing
Speedmaster Racing
Speedmaster Moonphase
Speedmaster Moonphase
Speedmaster Skywalke
Speedmaster Skywalke
Speedmaster Spacemaster
Speedmaster Spacemaster

DE VILLE

There are five De Ville lines, not the least of which are the stylish LADYMATICS with 49 unique models. The HOUR VISION Co-Axial Master Chronometers come in 18 models in stainless-steel and gold (all 41mm in diameter). There are 53 elegant round TRESOR models ranging from 36mm to 40mm, and the De Ville PRESTIGE collection offers 115 models for men, and 84 for women, in an assortment of precious metals, rare dials, and diamonds. There are also 4 new De Ville Prestige models produced in co-operation with ORBIS to raise funds for curable blindness in an ongoing charitable partnership, from 27.4mm to 39.5mm, all with their Teddy Bear logo on the dials/case backs.

De Ville Ladymatic
De Ville Ladymatic
De Ville Hour Vision
De Ville Hour Vision
De Ville Tresor
De Ville Tresor
De Ville Prestige
De Ville Prestige

As a final thought, the research and laboratory at Omega has always prospered on innovation. Whether it's horologic tech, style, or scientific precision, their quest never ends. Omega has always been of the most progressive pioneers, with that tradition happily supported and advanced by the children and grandchildren of founder Louis Brandt. Omega has always been at the right place at the right time, including on the moon.